Edward James Sickles Obituary



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Obituary

Edward James Sickles


Edward James Sickles

    SGT. EDWARD SICKLES KILLED IN CAR CRASH

    Former Local Resident Was On Maneuvers At Camp Davis, N.C.

    Sgt. Edward J. Sickles, former Matawan resident and a native of Keyport, was killed early last Thursday morning in an automobile accident on Highway 17, near Camp Davis, N.C., where he was stationed. Ed Sickles was one of six men riding in the passenger car, which struck a parked bus. Two of the others are in critical condition.

    Sgt. Sickles, who was twenty-three years old, entered the service in 1941. He was a member of the 82nd Airborne Division America, which was the old Division of Sgt. Alvin York of World War I fame. The Division was at the southern camp on maneuvers, from Ft. Bragg, N.C.

    Sgt. Sickles was raised in Keyport, the only child of Frederick I. Sickles and Edna Mae (Walling). His mother died at his birth and the boy and his father had moved to Matawan. Of recent years, they lived in Keansburg, where the father died several months ago.

    Sgt. Sickles is survived by his wife, Mary Ruth Sickles and a daughter, Ruth Mae Sickles.

    Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon, at the home of his Uncle, Tunis Sickles, 318 Main Street, Matawan, with Reverand Garret S. Ditweller, pastor of the First Baptist Church and his Army Chaplan, officiating. Full military honors are accorded the deceased. The Fort Monmouth band will play appropriate selections and soldiers will act as pall bearers and honorary bearers. A guard of honor will be placed at the coffin. Internment will be at the Green Grove Cemetery, Keyport, NJ. There will be a firing squad fire a volle over the grave and a bugler sounding taps. END


    His mother, Edna Mae Walling, died during child birth (his birth) and his father raised him alone. His father died on December 2nd, 1942, I was born on Debember 3rd, 1942 and my father was scheduled to go to the Normandy in April, 1943, but was killed in an auto accident on February 18th, 1943, while on maneuvers.

    There were six 82nd Airborne soldiers in the vehicle. The weather was rainy and the roads were slippery. The accident occurred and my dad was killed instantly. There were five other soldiers in the vehicle that were seriously insured, but thankfully, they survived.

    My mother and I were living in North Carolina when the accident occurred. Here is what the letter said that she received on the day of the accident:

    Telegram:

      MRS. EDWARD J. SICKLES

      IT IS WITH DEAPEST REGRET THAT IT IS NECESSARY TO INFORM YOU OF THE DEATH OF YOUR HUSBAND, EDWARD J. SICKLES, BATTERY F, 82ND AIRBORNE DIVISION, WHO DIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY EIGHTEENTH. STOP. DO YOU WISH REMAINS SHIPPED HOME, AT GOVERMENT EXPENSE? IF SO ADVISE DESTINATION AND CONSIGNEE. END SURG

          LADD CAMP DAVIS
      EL ALEXANDER
      1ST LT. MAC
      ADJUTANT


    His body, accompanied by my mother (who was an orphan), his Chaplan and myself, were transported, via train, to Keansburg, New Jersey. My mother was told, during the funeral, that he was the first soldier, from Monmouth County, to be killed during WW II, so he was given very special attention.

    He had full military honors and my mother said it was like a parade; the Monmouth County military band was there, his Chaplan from the 82nd Airborne travelled to NJ to offer his final prayers, MANY of the men who served with him, from all over the United States, took leave and carried him to his grave. My mother said it was the biggest funeral she had ever attended.

    Unfortunately, who ever inscribed the stone, made a very bad mistake and the stone reads: SGT. EDWARD JAMES; the name Sickles does not appear. Therefore, he is apparently not on any list what so ever, not even the VA list, for placing the American flags. Like I said before, I personally feel that he is the "Forgotten Soldier." My mother knew about this error, but was too busy all of her life, working in factories to raise me, so the error was left uncorrected until now, but it bothered her right up until the day she died, on November 7th, 2000 of brain Cancer. She never remarried...

      Submitted by his daughter


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