Obits - NJ - 1888 - Christian Schnepper

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Obits - NJ - Monmouth - Christian Schnepper

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Christian Schnepper, who formerly kept the barber shop in Red Bank now owned by John Kaiser, committed suicide in Central Park, New York, last Sunday by shooting himself through the head. He was a native of Germany, and had served his time in the German army. he started a barber shop in Red Bank about nine years ago, and built up a good business. Two year ago he sold out the business to John Kaiser, who still conducts it. Mr. Schnepper was afflicted with brain trouble, and had three paralytic strokes, each of which was due to the disease of the brain. When he sold out his business in Red Bank to Mr. Kaiser, he was a book agent for a short time, and he then bought out the kerosene oil route of Mr. Goodenough. He gave this up in a short time, and then worked for Phil Kuhl. He was a policeman at Monmouth Park during the summer of 1887. About two months ago he bought out a barber shop at Ocean Grove, and moved his family to that place from Como, in Wall township, where they had lived for some time previously. He was doing a good business at his Ocean Grove stand. He went to New York last Saturday, and on Sunday he killed himself as above stated. Dr. Wm. A. Betts, who was his physician, says he had not been exactly right in his head for some time.

Mr. Schnepper was married and leaves a wife and three children. He leaves no property, and when his neighbors in Ocean Grove and Asbury Park learned of his death, they contributed generously to Mrs. Schnepper's present needs and also made up a purse of $25 for her. Mr. Schnepper was a member of the Red Bank lodge of the Knights of Pythias.

Death notice lists his age as about 35 years.

Source: Red Bank Register Wednesday, November 28, 1888